Six Heartland customers make upgrades, receive grants

March was a busy month for energy efficiency projects in Heartland customer communities.  Heartland awarded six energy efficiency grants to utilities for making street lighting upgrades and installing new meters.

Miller, SD began a street lighting project upgrading 40 lights from high pressure sodium to LED.  With annual energy savings expected at 14,510 kWh and a simple payback period of less than five years, Miller was awarded a grant of $4,200.

Heartland Communications Manager Ann Hyland, second from left, presents an energy efficiency grant to Miller Electric Superintendent Bill Lewellen, Mayor Ron Blachford and Finance Officer Sheila Coss.

Heartland Communications Manager Ann Hyland, second from left, presents an energy efficiency grant to Miller Electric Superintendent Bill Lewellen, Mayor Ron Blachford and Finance Officer Sheila Coss.


Bryant, SD received a grant for $5,000 as they recently started upgrading street lights throughout the city, replacing 45 mercury vapor lights and six high pressure sodium lights with LEDs.  The project is a viable one for the city with savings estimated at 29,842 kWh per year and a simple payback of three years.

Heartland Communications Manager Ann Hyland, center, presents an energy efficiency grant to Bryant Electric Superintendent Garry Ladwig and Mayor Albert Yalowizer.

Heartland Communications Manager Ann Hyland, center, presents an energy efficiency grant to Bryant Electric Superintendent Garry Ladwig and Mayor Albert Yalowizer.


Madelia, MN started the second phase of their street lighting upgrade this year, replacing 60 high pressure sodium fixtures with LEDs and receiving a grant of $5,000. Annual energy savings are expected at just over 36,000 kWh and the project is expected to pay for itself in energy savings in just over four years.

Heartland Communications Manager presents an energy efficiency grant to Madelia Municipal Light & Power General Manager Jim Maras.

Heartland Communications Manager presents an energy efficiency grant to Madelia Municipal Light & Power General Manager Jim Maras.


High pressure sodium street lights along the highway in Volga, SD are being upgraded to LED.  The city was awarded a grant for $2,800 for replacing 18 fixtures for expected annual savings of 11,245 kWh and a simple payback period of just under five years.

Heartland Communications Manager Ann Hyland presents an energy efficiency grant to Volga City Administrator Andrew Bremseth.

Heartland Communications Manager Ann Hyland presents an energy efficiency grant to Volga City Administrator Andrew Bremseth.


Sixty street lights are being replaced in Sioux Falls, SD for expected savings of just over 48,000 kWh annually.  High pressure sodium lights in different sections of the city will be upgraded to LED and the project will see a simple payback of less than five years.  The city was awarded a grant from Heartland for $5,000.

Heartland Communications Manager Ann Hyland presents an energy efficiency grant to Sioux Falls Light & Power Superintendent Jerry Jongeling and Sustainability Coordinator Jessica Lantgen.

Heartland Communications Manager Ann Hyland presents an energy efficiency grant to Sioux Falls Light & Power Superintendent Jerry Jongeling and Sustainability Coordinator Jessica Lantgen.


Truman, MN was awarded an energy efficiency grant of $5,000 for two separate projects.  The city is upgrading 30 high pressure sodium street lights with LEDs for expected annual savings of 22,000 kWh and the project will pay for itself in savings in less than two and a half years.  Truman is also upgrading a portion of the city’s electric meters with an AMR system.

Heartland Communications Manager Ann Hyland, second from left, presents an energy efficiency grant to Truman Commission Chair Brad Nickerson, Public Utilities Foreman Justin Anderson and Public Utilities Office Manager Judi Davis.

Heartland Communications Manager Ann Hyland, second from left, presents an energy efficiency grant to Truman Commission Chair Brad Nickerson, Public Utilities Foreman Justin Anderson and Public Utilities Office Manager Judi Davis.


Heartland awards energy efficiency grants to customers for projects that improve efficiencies within the city. For more information contact Heartland Communications Manager Ann Hyland at 605-256-6536 or visit www.youcanpowerforward.com.

South Dakota’s 125th Anniversary

A column by Gov. Dennis Daugaard:

On Nov. 2, 1889, at 2:40 p.m., President Benjamin Harrison signed South Dakota into statehood. Before signing the statehood proclamations for the two Dakotas, President Harrison instructed Secretary of State James Blaine to cover both proclamations under a sheet of paper. President Harrison signed both, and then shuffled them again so that no one, not even the President, knew which proclamation was signed first.

One hundred twenty-five years later, I can’t help but be proud of all we have accomplished.

Our farmers and ranchers survived the Dust Bowl, withstood blizzards, droughts and floods, and built an agricultural economy that is as strong as it has ever been.

This is the place where Gutzon Borglum and Korczak Ziolkowski found their stone canvases; where Laura Ingalls Wilder grew up in her “Little Town on the Prairie”; and where Kevin Costner let the world see the pride and culture of the Lakota people, against the backdrop of South Dakota’s breathtaking landscapes in “Dances with Wolves.”

This is the place where a well-digger named Peter Norbeck created one of the nation’s best state parks; where a quiet professor named George McGovern became a candidate for president and an advocate for the hungry; and where a high school dropout named Bill Janklow connected our schools to the Internet and made a university in Madison a leader in cybersecurity.

Our history is one of perseverance. In overcoming obstacles, we don’t merely survive; we prosper and achieve beyond anyone’s expectations. This is something country singer Kyle Evans understood when he composed a special tribute to our state twenty-five years ago. He wrote:

Where horses traveled dusty trails, fancy cars now drive on superhighways,
Where one-room cabins used to stand, modern high rise buildings line the skyways,
Where there once was just a mountain, today there are faces carved in stone,
And they represent the freedom of this South Dakota land we call home.

Let us never take for granted this lifestyle unequalled in this land,
Where a friend is still a true friend, always there to lend a helping hand,
Where religion is still our guideline and Old Glory will always be unfurled,
Where you’ll find old-fashioned values in a fast-moving modern day world.

As Mr. Evans perceived, our state has changed a lot since President Harrison signed that important document. But South Dakotans are still the same at heart – our values, work-ethic and neighborliness still remain. That’s what makes our state exceptional.

So let’s pause today to celebrate what we’ve already achieved; and tomorrow we’ll continue the trek forward in building upon what our forefathers began.

Happy birthday South Dakota!

Accounting & Finance webinar: Performing a Utility Financial Check-up

American Public Power Association (APPA) is offering an accounting and finance-themed webinar on Thursday, October 16. The webinar, titled Performing a Utility Financial Check-Up, is one of a webinar series but can be taken on its own. It will feature Dawn Lund, VicePresident of Utility Financial Solutions in Holland, Michigan, and is scheduled to begin at 2pm EST.

From the description: A utility’s policies can help ensure its current and future financial stability by maintaining key financial targets and ensuring funds exist to ensure reliable service to customers. In this webinar, participants will learn guidelines, methods and tools used by industry professionals to assess a utility’s financial health. The speaker will also discuss topics such as financial targets, debt and purchasing policies, and rate methods used by utilities across the country.

Topics will include:

  • How to monitor the utility’s financial health
  • Identifying rate structure risk and methods to minimize and control risk
  • Proper capital planning
  • Monitoring, exposure and methods to control the utility’s revenue stability
  • Timing of rate structure reviews
  • Communicating utility financial performance and rate changes to policymakers and customers

Cost is $89 for APPA members and $179 for non-members. Heartland customers qualify for the discounted rate. To learn more or register, click HERE.

Video

Game Day in Madison

Heartland is proud to have an active presence in our hometown community of Madison, SD. Some of that presence includes sponsorship of local events, programs and organizations, such as the local high school athletic booster club.

Madison High School recently renovated their building and built a new gymnasium. With the upgrade in facilities, the school installed new scoreboards that feature video and playback content. As a game day sponsor, Heartland has produced a 30-second commercial which runs on the boards during timeouts and game breaks.

If you can’t make it to a basketball or volleyball game this season, you can check out our video online, after the link below.

HCPD-MHS Commercial 2014

Good luck to all Bulldogs! We’re proud to serve the city of Madison with the Power of Forward Thinking–ensuring the lights are on game day and every day.

APPA offers webinar series on new OSHA rules

Starting Tuesday, Sept. 17, The American Public Power Association (APPA) Academy is offering a series of four webinars designed to provide an overview of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s (OSHA) revised rules for electric generation, transmission and distribution. This series will provide an overview of the changes outlined in both §1910.269 and §1926 Subpart V, as well as how are these requirements are expected to impact utilities.

All webinars take place from 1 – 2:30 p.m. Central. The series includes the following four webinars, which can be taken individually or as a series for a discounted rate:

Host Employer/Contractor Information Transfer and General Training, September 17

  • Host employers (e.g., utilities) and contract employers must exchange information regarding known hazards, as well as the conditions, characteristics, design and operation of the host employer’s system.  Work rules and procedures must be coordinated between the host employer and contract employer, and must be designed to protect all employees.
  • Host employers must also provide employees with all known information relating to the determination of existing characteristics and conditions. Compliance date for these elements of the new rule was July 10, 2014, but OSHA has established a temporary enforcement policy for these rules until October 31, 2014.
  • General Training: There are several updates to general training standards. Training is to be determined based on hazard assessments and risk potential to the worker for the hazards involved. Qualified workers must be trained to recognize and control or avoid electrical hazards at the worksite.

Fall Protection, October 30

  • Summary of Fall Protection Rule: The revised rule requires that employers ensure that all employees (both unqualified and qualified employees) working at a height of more than 1.2 meters (4 feet) above a lower surface use fall protection equipment. These rules are objective based, and allow each utility to determine how to protect employees based on the hazards present in the workplace.
    • Hazards that must be assessed and mitigated by the employer include when employees are climbing or changing location on poles, towers or similar structures.  The provision contains limited exemptions for the use of fall protection while climbing or changing locations and includes:
      • When the use of such equipment is infeasible; and
      • When using the equipment creates a greater hazard than when climbing or changing locations without it.
  • The final rule also covers revised requirements that employees are protected from falls when working from aerial lifts. The compliance date for this element of the rule is April 1, 2015.
  • In addition to a review of this portion of the rule, this webinar will also cover the experiences some utilities have had with implementing these rules, such as:
    • Implementation and budgeting issues;
    • Costs;
    • Different brands of equipment; and
    • How to sell the new requirements to employees

Arc Protection and Flame-Resistant Clothing, November 10

In order to provide protection from electric arcs, employers must assess the workplace to identify employees who are exposed to hazards from flames or electric arcs, and make reasonable estimates of the employees’ exposure to incident heat energy.

This webinar will cover how employers are to ensure (under certain conditions) that employees wear a flame-resistant outer layer of clothing that will provide protection based upon the assessments completed by the employer.

Overall, employers must ensure that employees who are exposed to hazards from electric arcs wear protective clothing and other protective equipment with an arc rating that is greater than or equal to the estimated heat energy. The revised rule requires that employers complete an analysis of the workplace by January 1, 2015, that includes an estimate of the incident heat energy of any potential electric-arc hazards to which employees could be exposed. The compliance date for the additional elements of the provision is April 1, 2015.

Minimum Approach Distance, December 16

  • A comparison of the old and new Minimum Approach Distance (MAD) values to see how much the minimum approach distances have changed for various voltage levels;
  • A review of when MADs have to be calculated and when table values can be used;
  • A discussion of how to calculate MADs based on “T” which is the maximum anticipated per-unit transient overvoltage factor (also sometimes referred to as a switching surge factor);
  • A working knowledge of Appendix B to OSHA §1910.269 which is titled, “Working on Exposed Energized Parts”;
  • An understanding of the term “Reach” and the phrase, “Reasonably Likely Movements of Employee”;
  • An understanding of the terms “Phase-to-Ground Exposure” and “Phase-to-Phase Exposure”;
  • What Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) is required to go inside the MAD and at what position the employee can put on and remove the PPE; and
  • The timeline that OSHA has proposed to require the use of the new MAD values

Who should attend:

  • Power lineman/superintendents
  • Utility directors
  • Crew foremen
  • Engineers
  • Technicians
  • Safety personnel
  • Tree trimmers
  • Contractors
  • Others working in the electric utility industry

The registration fee for individual webinars is $89 for APPA members and $179 for nonmembers. Purchase the entire 4-part webinar series and get one webinar free: $267 for APPA members and $537 for nonmembers.

Click HERE for more information or to register.